El-Zakzaky refuses treatment from Indian doctors, gets ultimatum to return to Nigeria

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Facts have just emerged that the Leader of the Islamic Movement of Nigeria (IMN) Sheikh Ibrahim El-Zakzaky has refused treatment from unknown doctors put in place to treat him in India aside those billed and booked to treat him before his departure from Nigeria.

A member of the Islamic Human Rights Commission (IHRC) who spoke to PRNigeria via an audio tape said the attitude of Indian government has portrayed El-Zakzaky as a common criminal when no court in Nigeria has convicted him.

The source said that the Indian government has given Elzakzaky ultimatum to leave Indian soil if he refuses to receive treatment from unknown doctors billed to treat him.

“I just received a very worrying news from the Indian government that ultimatum has been given to the Leader of the Islamic Movement of Nigeria(IMN) to leave India if he does not agree to the Doctors specified to treat him. From the way that he is being treated is extremely bad”, the IHRC representative said.

“Under the current situation, it seems he has no choice other than to go back to Nigeria. He has been given some hours to respond to their ultimatum. This is to me is totally, utterly unacceptable by any standard, either international standards or Indian standards or that of humanity”, the IHRC chief said.

He further noted that “This is a man that has not been found guilty of anything to the extent that in his own country, the highest court has granted him permission that he should be treated. The Indian government by their behavior depicts Sheikh Elzakzaky as a common criminal. This is really outrageous and those who stand for justice should please respond.”

In an audio message released on Wednesday, El-Zakzaky described the situation as “worse than a prison setting”.

The IMN leader and his wife left Nigeria for the Asian country on Monday based on a leave granted by a Kaduna high court.

In the audio, El-Zakzaky lamented the security situation in the hospital, describing it as “pathetic and worrisome”.

“The hospital officials received us well they told us that they parked two ambulance vehicles, deceiving the crowd while taking us out through another way, saying that it was for our own safety,” he said.

“On getting to the hospital, we were placed under a tighter security situation worse than what we have been witnessed in Nigeria. We are currently more confined than when we were in Nigeria, worse than a prison setting.

“Back home in Nigeria, they agreed that nobody should take us to any other hospital aside the hospital of our choice but we got to realize that the doctors they brought to us were there just to give advice.

“All what we have seen here, have shown us that there is no trust, they just brought us here for another detention. I have been in detention for about thirteen years but I’ve never seen this kind of security that I’m seeing here, even at the door of my hospital room, there are many security personnel waiting, heavily armed.

“They didn’t even allow me to go to the next room, I started asking myself, all these while I’ve been in detention, I’ve never seen this type. Even if I’m in the cell, they usually lock us up around 9pm and open the cell around 7am and they allow us to go anywhere we want in the area we are.”

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